Falling and Rising, Movement

Basics 2-of-5

Descriptions

This section is an attempt to define those movements considered essential in building a system adaptable to every individual. These are the foundation on which to build; and, without which, success is not assured. While the list is as complete as possible, there is bound to be some omission.

Falling and Rising

Forward/Rolls:

Fall Forward when rolling is not feasible. Land finger-tips first, allowing them to collapse and transfer the impact to your palms, keep your body straight and avoid twisting your back, (as if you were doing a pushup) (do not allow your knees to strike the ground); using your arms, lower your upper body to the ground (turning your head to the side), then your legs; roll to one side or the other by sliding an arm under your body to become your rear guard as you assume the Defense position. As soon as possible, use your back arm to lift your torso up to the Base position; then, get up. Drop and Roll allows for a voluntary movement to alter the dynamics of your situation. Lower your body, tucking in to a ball, put your hands on the ground shifting your weight forward, your hands open, using either the right arm or both, to protect your head, (hotdog or shoulder) roll to a Fighting position facing your attacker. A Forward Roll is preferred over falling. Tuck your chin to your chest and execute a shoulder roll (you may use your arm to assist taking some of the impact during the roll); your body rolls along the diagonal from your shoulder to the opposite hip; the momentum of the roll allows you to regain your feet.


Side:

Cross back 45° to the side you wish to land on with the opposite side's leg, lower yourself so you land on four points: the side of your calf, the side of your thigh, your hip (if you are in total control it can be that side's butt muscle, then your rib cage, (to prevent injury keep that side's arm on your stomach); try to prevent rocking (so he cannot grab your elevated leg or attack your groin); assume the Base position as soon as possible and regain your feet.


Back/Rolls:

Use your strongest leg to support you, while your other slides forward, tuck your chin on your chest; cross your arms on your chest; lower your body straight down, butt to heel, without twisting (to prevent back injury) lower your back flat to ground keeping your head on your chest (so you don't strike it on the ground), keep your feet from rocking. To get up from this position, you shift to a Defense position, then, a Base position to rise. Or: bring your knees up to your chest and shoot them back (not up) behind you to one side of your head or the other, continue the movement, as you would to complete a Back Roll. The Back Roll utilizes your support leg to lower yourself to the ground. Using the momentum backwards you will roll over the support leg's shoulder (not your head!) along the 45° diagonal and kick back with the other foot. (This will cause the knee of the support leg to ground and the other foot to be in position to stand). Quickly stand and adjust to a Fighting position.


Base:

From the Base position, lift your butt off the ground with your supporting right hand and left foot, your right leg is now in the air. Shoot your right leg to the inside of your right hand and behind you; and, stand up in a Fighting position. Or: execute a Back Roll utilizing your (opposite side) support hand, if necessary.


Sitting:

From the Sitting position, lean forward, using the sides of your feet, push against the ground, and lift your body up, twisting to a Fighting position. Or: As you rise, twist 180° to the rear and lean forward placing both of your hands on the ground; execute a rear kick into him.


Movement

Proper movement transitions us from stance to stance in a smooth, balanced, instinctive manner. It automatically adjusts for proper distance and position regarding defense and countering. Movement and stances are inseparable in technique application.

Stepping (with Pivot)

In all stepping movements the back foot must be adjusted to the proper distance or position required for the new stance you are entering.

Forward:

Straight along the center-line.


45° Forward:

To the right or left of the center-line.


Sideways:

About 90° to the right or left of the center-line.


Back:

Straight along the center-line.


45° Back:

To the right or left of the center-line.


Crescent:

Feet start or come together. One inscribes a 'Crescent' or 'C' as it moves. This allows the foot to go around obstacles such as his legs.


Stutter:

Very quickly done. Feet are brought together. As the one sets down, the other immediately picks up and resets to the appropriate distance allowing the first to kick.


Crossing Over (The instep)

In Advance:

Both knees are bent; the advancing foot is flat on the ground; the back foot, heel in the air, ball on the ground; continue in advance or pivot.


In Retreat:

Both knees are bent; the retreating foot is flat on the ground; the front foot, heel in the air, ball on the ground; continue in retreat or pivot.


Crossing Back (Behind the heel)

In Retreat:

Both knees are bent; the retreating foot is placed ball on the ground heel in the air, the front foot is flat on the ground; continue in retreat or pivot.


In Advance:

Both knees are bent; the advancing foot is heel in the air, ball on the ground the back foot is flat on the ground; continue in advance or pivot.


Shuffling

In Advance:

Push - Drag. Step forward with the front foot (toe - heel or heel - toe) (back leg does the push), move the rear foot forward the same distance (the drag part) or greater if desired.
Step - Push - Drag. Step forward (closer to the front foot) with the rear foot; then do Push - Drag.
Push - Step - Push - Drag. Step forward with the front foot, then do Step - Push - Drag.


In Retreat:

Push - Drag. Step back with the back foot (toe - heel) (front leg does the push), move the front foot back the same distance (the drag part) or greater if desired.
Step - Push - Drag. Step back (closer to the back foot) with the front foot; then do Push - Drag.
Push - Step - Push - Drag. Step back with the back foot, then do Step - Push - Drag.


Speed Shift

Head (slips)

Head movement is one of the most important skills to develop. It lessens your chances of receiving head injuries in violent confrontations or even accidentally in daily mishaps.

Straight:

Your obliques crunch, pulling your head slightly to the side, as your opposite side shoulder pops 45° forward and down towards your center-line loading up your, now, back hand and completing the head movement.


Slide:

Executed either entering straight forward or when exiting. Drop (using gravity) as you start to Push; and as your Drag occurs come back up.


"U":

Used against hooks and the occasional head kick.


Dip:

Rear: